Now in its 3rd year, the SLJ’s Research Seminar Series invites leading scholars from Australia and overseas to present their current scholarship, as well as showcasing our own distinguished researchers. In 2019, the Series featured key environmental, theoretical, and critical property themes.

Professor Margaret Davies with Professor William MacNeil at the School’s Town vs Gown’ croquet match at the historic Lismore Croquet Club

Professor Margaret Davies with Professor William MacNeil at the School’s Town vs Gown’ croquet match at the historic Lismore Croquet Club

In September, the Matthews Flinders Distinguished Professor of Law at Flinders University, South Australia, Professor Margaret Davies gave a world premiere of her latest work ‘Eco-legality, or Putting Nature into Natural Law’. Margaret, the author of five monographs, six edited books, numerous journal articles/book chapters, and the recipient of four ARC grants, is a global thought leader in critical legal theory, feminist jurisprudence, legal pluralism, and the philosophy of property.

Margaret also joined us afterwards at the School’s Town vs Gown’ croquet match at the historic Lismore Croquet Club (pictured above with Professor William MacNeil).

In August, UNSW’s Associate Professor Amelia Thorpe gave a fascinating paper on ‘Parking Day’, a global social movement where inner-city residents transform neighbourhood parking spaces into temporary green spaces – all for the cost of several hours of a paid parking meter. Amelia is an architect, planner and lawyer. Her research explores the governance of cities, from the writ small – the deeply contextual fabric of DIY urbanism and the imaginings of property theory – to the writ large, of institutional frameworks for decision-making in city planning and development.

Associate Professor Amelia Thorpe, UNSW

Associate Professor Amelia Thorpe, UNSW.

In June, Professor Afshin Akhtar-Khavari from the Faculty of Law at QUT, explored the social life of plants and trees as the basis for a new theory of ecological recovery law.

In November, UNSW’s Professor Brendan Edgeworth analysed the 2019 High Court decision of Northern Territory v Griffiths. Arguably the court’s most important native title pronouncement since Wik Peoples v Queensland, Griffiths established for the first time clear criteria for quantifying the compensation payable where native title is subject to “loss, diminution, impairment or other effects”.

And in October, the cutting edge and provocative ethos of this Series was highlighted with Associate Professor Kate Galloway’s paper, ‘Our Data Ourselves: A Case Study of Sperm.’ Kate is one of Australia’s leading scholars in property law, native title and legal education.

More than 40 people attended Dr Alessandro Pelizzon’s seminar in March 2019 (pictured above). “Neither natural nor posited: a contemporary journey towards an Ecological Jurisprudence”.

2019 Speakers and their topics: