Program and Keynotes

Conference programs will be published early October 2019.

LLHAA 2019 Speakers

Claire G. Coleman

Claire G. Coleman

Writer

Claire G. Coleman is a writer from Western Australia. She identifies with the South Coast Noongar people. Her family are associated with the area around Ravensthorpe and Hopetoun. Claire grew up in a Forestry settlement in the middle of a tree plantation, where her dad worked, not far out of Perth.

She wrote her black&write! fellowship-winning book Terra Nullius while travelling around Australia in a caravan. The Old Lie is her second novel.

Dr Carwyn Jones

Dr Carwyn Jones

Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, Victoria University of Wellington

Dr Carwyn Jones is a New Zealand Māori of Ngāti Kahungunu descent and is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Law at Victoria University of Wellington. He completed undergraduate study at Victoria University of Wellington and his graduate study in Canada (at York University and the University of Victoria). Prior to joining the faculty in Wellington, Carwyn worked in various roles at the Māori Land Court and Waitangi Tribunal. His primary research interests relate to the Treaty of Waitangi and Indigenous legal traditions, and he has published numerous articles on these topics.

Carwyn is the author of New Treaty, New Tradition – Reconciling New Zealand and Māori Law (UBC Press, 2016) and co-editor of Indigenous Peoples and the State: International Perspectives on the Treaty of Waitangi (Routledge, 2018). He is Co-Editor of the Māori Law Review and of AlterNative – an international journal of Indigenous peoples, and is a member of the editorial board of MAI Journal – a New Zealand journal of Indigenous scholarship. He was a United Nations Indigenous Fellow in 2012 and is a member of the Independent Monitoring Mechanism for the Implementation of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in Aotearoa New Zealand. Carwyn also served as a negotiator for his community, Ngā Iwi me ngā Hapū o Te Rohe o Te Wairoa, in the settlement of their historical claims against the Crown.

Dr Barbara Nicholson

Dr Barbara Nicholson

Senior Wadi Wadi woman, poet, activist and published author of multiple works.

Dr Nicholson has held executive positions on the Human Research Ethics Committee at University of Wollongong, the Ethics Committee for the Australian Institute Of Criminology, and the Aboriginal Deaths in Custody Watch Committee.

Dr Nicholson graduated from the University of Newcastle with a triple major in English Literature. She went on to teach Aboriginal Studies at the University of New South Wales and University of Wollongong. She is the project leader of “Dreaming Inside”, a creative writing program at Junee Correctional Centre that comprises a series of workshops with Aboriginal inmates. The project has resulted in the publication of six volumes, of which Dr Nicholson is the Chief Editor.

Dr Nicholson was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Wollongong School of Law in 2014.

Jill Stauffer

Jill Stauffer

Associate Professor and Director of the program in Peace, Justice and Human Rights at Haverford College

Jill Stauffer is Associate Professor and Director of the program in Peace, Justice and Human Rights at Haverford College. She is on the Board of Directors for the non-profit book series Voice of Witness, which illuminates human rights crises through the stories of the women and men who live through them. Her academic interests include philosophy of law, political philosophy, continental philosophy, and ethics. She has published articles on practices of hearing that succeed or fail, legal and political responsibility, political reconciliation, child soldiers, settler colonial silences, and the rule of law. Her edited volume, Nietzsche and Levinas: After the Death of a Certain God, was published by Columbia University Press in 2009. Her book Ethical Loneliness: The Injustice of Not Being Heard was published by Columbia University Press in 2015. She is currently working on a book called Lapse Time: Interruption and Resistance in International Law and the Settler Colonial State.

 

Samo Tomšič

Samo Tomšič

Research Fellow, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany

Samo Tomšič obtained his PhD in Philosophy at the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. He is currently research fellow at the Humboldt University Berlin, Germany. His research areas comprise continental philosophy, epistemology, structuralism and psychoanalysis. Recent publications include The Capitalist Unconscious: Marx and Lacan (Verso, 2015) and The Labour of Enjoyment. Toward a Critique of Libidinal Economy (August Verlag, 2019).

Title of the talk: Escape into Catastrophe. On the Resistance of Capitalism

LSAANZ 2019 Speakers

Professor Margaret Davies

Professor Margaret Davies

Flinders University

Margaret Davies is Matthew Flinders Distinguished Professor at Flinders University.

She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Law, and author of five books on legal theory and the philosophy of property.

Her latest book is Law Unlimited: Materialism, Pluralism, and Legal Theory (2017).

Jim Everett

Jim Everett

plangermairreenner man of the Turbuna-Meenamatta (Mt Ben Lomond) region

Jim Everett – puralia meenamatta was born at Flinders Island, Tasmania in 1942. 

Jim Everett is a plangermairreenner man of the Turbuna-Meenamatta (Mt Ben Lomond) region, a clan of the greater Cape Portland nations in North-east Tasmania.  Jim left primary school at 14 years to start work.  His working life includes 15 years at sea as a fisherman and merchant seaman, Australian Regular Army for 3 years, and over 50 years of formal involvement in the Aboriginal Struggle.  He has a long history of involvement in Aboriginal community-based organisations and in the public service, and has traveled Australia visiting many remote Aboriginal communities.  Jim began writing poetry at an early age.  His first play, We Are Survivors, was produced in 1984, and he directed and acted in it.  His written works include plays, political and keynote papers and short stories. He produced One People Sing Freedom (ABC-TV 1988), and has been associate producer in many documentary films.  He is published in many anthologies. Jim lives on Cape Barren Island writing and maintaining his involvement in cultural arts nationally.

John Flood

John Flood

Professor of Law and Society, Griffith University

John Flood is Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University. He is also Honorary Professor of Law at University College London and Research Fellow in the UCL Centre for Blockchain Technologies. He has researched in the field of legal profession, globalisation of law, and law and technology for ever. 

By training and disposition John is an ethnographer. He did his PhD with Howard Becker. His most recent publications are “Professions and Expertise: How Machine Learning and Blockchain are Redesigning the Landscape of Professional Knowledge and Organisation” (with L Robb) 73(2) University of Miami Law Review’s 2018 SymposiumHack to the Future: How Technology is Disrupting the Legal Profession 312-351 (2019); and “Legal Professionals of the Future: Their Ethos, Role and Skills”, in New Suits: Appetite for Disruption in the Legal World (eds) M DeStefano and G Dobrauz-Saldapenna, Stampfli Verlag (2019). 

He tweets at @johnaflood  

Justice François Kunc

Justice François Kunc

Supreme Court of NSW

The Honourable Justice François Kunc was appointed to the Supreme Court of New South Wales in April 2013 and sits in the Equity Division.  After graduating with degrees in Arts and Law from the University of Sydney he practised as a solicitor with Allen Allen and Hemsley from 1986.  He was called to the Bar in 1992 and was appointed Senior Counsel in 2007.  He was a leader of the commercial bar appearing in courts throughout Australia for major government, corporate and individual clients.

An inaugural member and past President of the Law and Literature Association of Australia, Justice Kunc has had a long interest in law, language and literature. He was a member of the specialist committee which wrote the Recommended National Standards for Working with Interpreters in Courts and Tribunals under the aegis of the Judicial Council on Cultural Diversity.

Justice Kunc is currently the General Editor of The Australian Law Journal and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Equity. Outside of the law he is the Chairman of the Layne Beachley Aim for the Stars Foundation and a director of the Opera Australia Capital Fund.

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