Search Results

 


Juris Apocalypse Now! Law in End Times.

Law Literature and Humanities (LLHAA) Conference Abstracts

A Tedious and Inarticulate Presentation that Very Fine Delegates will avoid: A Series of Unfortunate Events or The Common Law

Dr Thomas Giddens University of Dundee If you are hoping for an interesting and concise paper about the cutting edge concerns of the legal discipline, then you should stop reading now. Lemony Snicket’s history of the tragic events surrounding the Baudelaire orphans is a detailed and morbidly entertaining account that constructively requires, and thus inculcates in its readers, values of scholarly endeavour as a means of achieving justice and good citizenship. It is a performative argument for...

read more

A Theory of Art/Law at the End of Art and End of Law

Dr Lucy Finchett-Maddock University of Sussex, Senior Lecturer in Law and Art This piece seeks to account for an increased interest in the intersection of art and law within legal thinking, activism, and artistic practice, arguing there to exist the phenomena and movement of ‘Art/Law’. Art/Law is the coming together of theory and practice in legal and political aesthetics, understood as a practice, (im)materially performed. It is seen as a natural consequence of thinking law and resistance in...

read more

Anxiety, The Fear Event and Ontological Insecurity

Benjamin Cherry-Smith University of the Sunshine Coast Ontological insecurity occurs when a subject – either an individual or a state – has experienced a fear event which has developed into anxiety. The fear event is the initial motivator in the development of ontological insecurity and gets translated into the motivating anxiety within the subject's new security narrative. However, current uses of ontological security theory within international relations literature treat anxiety as...

read more

Artificial Business Judgment

Prof. Caleb Griffin Belmont University College of Law A firm’s management and board of directors exercise control of the firm on behalf of its investors, and they are bound by fiduciary duties to act for the best interests of the firm and its shareholders. Specifically, they are bound by their fiduciary duties of loyalty and care. Although managers and directors can face liability for violating these duties, they receive broad protection in the form of the business judgment rule. The business...

read more

Beastly Sovereignty: Humans and other animals in the Anthropocene

Dr Daniel Matthews University of Hong Kong The Anthropocene thesis, and the unfolding climate crisis to which it draws attention, prompts an encounter with the complex entanglements between humans and other animals. In the context of a larger study into sovereignty in the context of the ‘new climatic regime’, this paper draws on the work of Giorgio Agamben (The Open: Man and Animal) and Jacques Derrida (The Beast and the Sovereign) in order to think through the connection between sovereignty...

read more

Beauty Persignified and the end of Legal Personality: Why the law can’t prevent someone making a physical copy of me and what that means for individual identity

Ms Elizabeth Englezos Griffith University It is now possible to make a physical replica of a person from their digital data and images – a  signifier that can exist in the same material space as the signified. From digital data and images, 3-D printing and other technologies allow increasingly accurate reproductions of a real person.  This person may not wish to be reproduced. However, the law offers minimal remedies unless this signifier is applied for some sort of commercial benefit.  This...

read more

Become pertinent or perish: The International Criminal Court in Crisis and the importance of assessing its impact.

Aloka Wanigasuriya Faculty of Law, University of Copenhagen (Denmark) In today’s world we are constantly bombarded with news of wars and conflict taking place across the globe. Against this backdrop, the International Criminal Court (ICC) remains the only permanent international court with the mandate to try alleged perpetrators of the most heinous international atrocity crimes (i.e. genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression). However, during its 20-year existence, it has...

read more

Bisexual temporalities, queer futurity & the chrono-normativity of law

Dylan Stanford University of Wollongong Queer theorist Lee Edelman has infamously argued that queer is antithetical to ‘reproductive futurism’ whereby the present is eternally reproduced in the name of the Child. On the opposite side of the political equation conservative commentators have argued, in a strikingly similar fashion, that support for same-sex marriage and transgender children represents the end of civilisation as we know it. The concern with apocalyptic queer futures has paid...

read more

Can the Clitoris Speak? Understanding the High Court’s current deliberation on the constitution of the clitoris.

Speaking otherwise – representation, repression, regression Panel Home A/Prof Juliet Rogers University of Melbourne In June 2019 the High Court of Australia heard arguments on the question of what constitutes mutilation and as a corollary, whether the clitoral hood constitutes the clitoris or is a separate part. The separation of the clitoral hood from the clitoris is a crucial element of considering whether female genital cutting is akin to...

read more

Changing Race: Fluidity, Immutability and the Evolution of Equal-Protection Jurisprudence in American Constitutional Law

Professor John Tehranian Southwestern Law School One of the bedrock principles of American constitutional jurisprudence is its commitment to provide heightened scrutiny to laws that distinguish amongst us on the basis of certain immutable traits.  But race—the very trait that has historically received the most searching form of scrutiny under modern equal-protection doctrine—is far more fluid than the law has traditionally recognized.  This Paper examines the mutability of race—both through...

read more

Christchurch and the (im)possibility of speaking

Speaking otherwise – representation, repression, regression Panel Home Dr Sahar Ghumkhor University of Melbourne Solidarity acts like national days of mourning are national rituals of belonging. They can also mark what Sara Ahmed (2005) contends is the limit of the liberal multicultural nation’s capacity to take-on bad feelings, to experience national shame as redress for transformative justice. Liberal multiculturalism trades in the affective...

read more

Desperately Trying to be Heard: the voice of First Australians in Herzog’s Where the Green Ants Dream

Kim Weinert Griffith University Early representation of First Australians on film has always been framed by a colonial trope. Notwithstanding how wrongly perceived and portrayed First Australians were in early Australian cinema the overreaching effect of these binary social images also meant that their authentic voice was never really heard either on film and/or in Australian society. Weiner Herzog’s film Where the Green Ants Dream(1984) attempted to reverse this social image through the...

read more

Erotic Contracts and Presidential Bodies: The Persistent Plague of Heteronormative Contracts in the Cinematic Imaginary of Sovereign Authority

Dr Kirsty Duncanson LaTrobe University The contract at the centre of the film Fifty Shades of Grey (2015) reverberates with the sexual politics Pateman (1988) identified at the heart of the social contract, that mythical foundation of United States’ sovereign authority. In this paper I analyse the jurisprudential resonances of the film’s contract negotiation between the central couple, juxtaposing it with the intersecting sexual and social contracts at work in the contrastingly cynical...

read more

Feminist End Times Aka. Queering Our Inheritance

Dr Karen Crawley Griffith University Dr Honni van Rijswijk University of Technology Sydney We are living and working in an historical moment (late capitalism, dying neoliberalism and fraught feminisms) in which it seems urgent to both mobilise and interrogate the term “feminisms” as a set of critical methods and practices to understand #metoo, and #sayhername, and movements including #BlackLivesMatter. Similarly, the category “woman” still has critical and political potential, albeit...

read more

Hobbes is the Buried Giant: Apocalyptic state of nature thinking in Ishiguro’s, The Buried Giant

Rob Laird Australian National University I argue that Hobbes's antithesis between the "solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short" life experienced living in a state of nature and the "commodious" life afforded under sovereign rule and law is an important trope that supports contemporary sovereign law. It is a trope that encourages and supports the notion that the law is a good in itself, independent of its actual content. The axiom around which the antithesis revolves is an acceptance of...

read more

How are you today: What can we hear beyond crisis, sound, and the carceral on Manus?

James Parker Melbourne Law School Emma Russell La Trobe University Poppy de Souza La Trobe, Griffith University Since 2013, nearly two thousand men have been indefinitely detained on Manus Island by the Australian Government after arriving in this country seeking asylum. When the Manus Regional Processing Centre was formally closed on 31 October 2017, after the Papua New Guinea Supreme Court declared it unconstitutional, the men still detained there were forcefully evicted to new, smaller...

read more

Images of ‘evil’ and ‘hell’: International Law and Argentina’s 1983 Truth Commission

Valeria Vázquez Guevara University of Melbourne Law School This paper examines how the literary trope of ‘evil’ and ‘hell’ have been used in the final report of Argentina’s 1983 truth commission, a memoir and legal-political history book by Carlos Nino (Argentine jurist and intellectual designer of thetruth commission and the 1984 Junta Trials), and an essay by Ronald Dworkin (the prominent US jurist and friend of Nino) revisiting and analysing Argentina’s transition to democracy. The analysis...

read more

Imagining the Circumcised. Law, Circumcision and the Racialised Body

Dr Mareike Riedel Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity In this paper, I explore representations of circumcising groups, most notably Jews and Muslims, in the debates about infant male circumcision both past and present. Circumcision has long haunted the Euro-Christian imagination where the circumcised penis was associated with Jewish and Muslim Otherness and later played an important role in the racialisation of bodies. While today opposition is mainly framed as...

read more
Share This