Jun
6
Thu
Enslavement as a Crime against Humanity: Some Doctrinal, Historical and Theoretical Considerations @ Southern Cross University, Gold Coast Campus
Jun 6 @ 10:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Enslavement as a Crime against Humanity: Some Doctrinal, Historical and Theoretical Considerations @ Southern Cross University, Gold Coast Campus | Bilinga | QLD | AU

Enslavement as a Crime against Humanity: Some Doctrinal, Historical and Theoretical Considerations


Dr Edwin Bikundo, Griffith Law School


Although Slavery is legally defined as ‘the status or condition of a person over whom any or all of the powers attaching to the right of ownership are exercised’ this paper argues that ‘status’ is emphasised at the expense of ‘condition’. Slavery was declared a crime against international law much earlier than the category of crimes against humanity crystallised. In international humanitarian law it is also punishable as a war crime. In international human rights law slavery bears the distinction of being prohibited both under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights as well as – albeit less prominently – the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. In that way, it crosses the public/private divide as well as arguably sits at the threshold where entitlements almost seamlessly merge into rights. Historically slavery was justified on the one hand as an expression of natural law and contradictorily on the other hand as only justifiable through positive law because it was in breach of natural law. It therefore interrogated even the natural law/positive law dichotomy in illuminating ways. The inclusion of enslavement under the rubric of crimes against humanity therefore helps to not only further explain the essential elements of that category but also highlights how humanity itself is an evolving project and international criminal law plays a crucial role in this on-going anthropogenesis.


Mephistopheles: I’m your slave: I’m yours!


Faust: And what must I do in exchange?


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Faust




Keywords: Giorgio Agamben – Roberto Esposito – international criminal law – international human rights law – Roman Law


 


Dr Edwin Bikundo is a Senior Lecturer at the Griffith Law School, Program Director for the Master of International Law, and Managing Editor of the Griffith Law Review. The Griffith Law School is located on the Gold Coast Campus of Griffith University. 


 


https://scuonline.zoom.us/j/588367333



Dec
2
Mon
Law in End Times: Juris Apocalypse Now! (LLHAA) // Survive, Thrive, Die. (LSAANZ) @ Southern Cross University, Gold Coast Campus
Dec 2 @ 8:00 pm – Dec 8 @ 4:00 am



Southern Cross University School of Law and Justice is proud to convene and organise, together with the Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia (LLHAA) and the Law and Society Association of Australia and New Zealand (LSAANZ), the 2019 LLHAA conference and the 2019 LSAANZ conference, respectively titled JurisApocalypse Now! Law in End Times, and Survive. Thrive. Die. Law in End Times.


The two conferences, although distinct and separate, are nonetheless connected by a shared overarching theme, and are articulated around a shared Postgraduate Day. Scholars are invited, in a profoundly interdisciplinary manner, to participate in either or both conferences.




Key Dates



  • LLHAA 2-4 December 2019

  • Postgraduate Day 5 December 2019

  • LSAANZ 5-7 December 2019





  • Submission of Abstracts opens on 1 March 2019.

  • Closing date for submission of Abstracts is 31 July 2019.

  • Presenters must register by 31 August 2019.





  • Early Bird until 31 July 2019

  • Full Price from 1 August – 15 November 2019




Visit the website









Juris Apocalypse Now! Law in End Times – 2-4 December 2019




The conference will explore the intersection of legality, temporality and eschatology, the normatively uncertain and yet inherently creative space originated by the conflicting encounter between the orderly desire of law and the entropic tendency of apocalyptic narratives, with both forces cast against the backdrop of the ever-­deferred notion of time itself.


LLHAA conference registration automatically entitles you to become a member of the Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia (LLHAA) for a period of 12 months. Your contact information will be supplied to the LLHAA in order to receive Association communication. This includes information about prizes and upcoming relevant events. Your contact information is not given out to a third party except those institutions hosting LLHAA associated events. If you do not want this to happen then tick the box (below) asking to opt out of communications. You can also opt out of Association membership per se but you cannot opt to eliminate the membership fee from your conference registration. You can choose to opt out of LLHAA membership at checkout. 





 


Download the 2019 LLHAA Conference Postcard






Survive, Thrive, Die. Law in End Times. 5-7 December 2019





Social upheaval, political uncertainty, the end of history, or climate collapse: increasingly, such narratives seem to justify the state of exception in a plethora of contexts, slowly eroding the idea that social, political, and environmental stability can ever be achieved through the rule of law. The conference invites socio-legal scholars to re-imagine the question of law in the face of the ‘end times’.







Download the 2019 LSAANZ Conference Postcard











Additional Information


Visit the website: sljresearch.net.au/lawinendtimes



  • Submission of Abstracts opens on 1 March 2019.

  • Closing date for submission of Abstracts is 31 July 2019.

  • Presenters must register by 31 August 2019.


For each conference:



  • Early Bird $390 until 31 July 2019

  • Full Price $450 from 1 August – 15 November 2019

  • Conference Dinner $80


Attend BOTH conferences



  • Early Bird $580 until 31 July 2019

  • Full Price $680 from 1 August – 15 November 2019


One-day only attendance options will be available shortly.