May
3
Fri
The Hon. Andrew Rogers Lecture in Private Law and Legal Practice @ Lismore City Hall
May 3 @ 3:30 am – 5:30 am
The Hon. Andrew Rogers Lecture in Private Law and Legal Practice @ Lismore City Hall | Lismore | NSW | AU

Courage as a Legal Virtue


 


Our keynote speaker, The Honourable Justice François Kunc, was appointed to the Supreme Court of New South Wales in April 2013 and sits in the Equity Division.  After graduating with degrees in Arts and Law from the University of Sydney, he practised as a solicitor with Allen Allen and Hemsley from 1986. He was called to the Bar in 1992, and was appointed Senior Counsel in 2007.  He was a leader of the commercial bar appearing in courts throughout Australia for major government, corporate and individual clients. 


An inaugural member and past president of the Law and Literature Association of Australia, Justice Kunc has had a long-term interest in law, language and literature. He was a member of the specialist committee which wrote the Recommended National Standards for Working with Interpreters in Courts and Tribunals under the aegis of the Judicial Council on Cultural Diversity.


Justice Kunc is currently the General Editor of The Australian Law Journal and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Equity. Outside of the law he is the Chairman of the Layne Beachley Aim for the Stars Foundation and a director of the Opera Australia Capital Fund.


 


The Hon Andrew Rogers QC  was a Judge of the Supreme Court of New South Wales from 1979 to 1993.  From  1987 to 1992, he was the Chief Judge of the court’s commercial division, in which role he introduced innovative procedural changes in the conduct of commercial cases. One of his best-known judgments concerns the piercing of the corporate veil in a case involving an indigenous man who had contracted asbestosis while working for a subsidiary of James Hardie Pty Ltd:  Briggs v James Hardie & Co Pty Ltd (1989) 16 NSWLR 549, 567 (Rogers AJA). 


From 1992, he oversaw the establishment of the School of Law and Justice at Southern Cross University (then University of New England – Northern Rivers), in his role as chair of the University’s Law Advisory Committee. In 1995, he was installed as the first Chancellor of the newly formed Southern Cross University by the Governor of New South Wales, a position he held from 1995 – 1997.


Since his retirement from the bench in 1993, he has worked as a legal consultant for the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) and the law firm Clayton Utz. Until recently, he acted as an international legal consultant, specialising in the areas of arbitration, meditation and dispute resolution, with his expertise spanning relevant legislation in the U.K., U.S., Asia and Europe as well as Australian law. He has served as Chairman, Sole Arbitrator and member of Arbitral Tribunals dealing with claims totalling more than $2 billion in various countries around the world. 


His other roles have included as Probity Adviser  to the Leighton Group of Companies, Chairman of Audit Quality Review Board Limited, Deputy Chairman of ILSAC, Patron of the Australian Corporate Lawyers Association (NSW Division) and Patron of the Ted Noffs Foundation since the early 1990s.


In 2015 he was awarded an Order of Australia for distinguished services to the judiciary and to the law, especially reforms to commercial dispute resolution and case management, through contributions to international commercial arbitration and to the community.

Jun
6
Thu
Enslavement as a Crime against Humanity: Some Doctrinal, Historical and Theoretical Considerations @ Southern Cross University, Gold Coast Campus
Jun 6 @ 10:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Enslavement as a Crime against Humanity: Some Doctrinal, Historical and Theoretical Considerations @ Southern Cross University, Gold Coast Campus | Bilinga | QLD | AU

Enslavement as a Crime against Humanity: Some Doctrinal, Historical and Theoretical Considerations


Dr Edwin Bikundo, Griffith Law School


Although Slavery is legally defined as ‘the status or condition of a person over whom any or all of the powers attaching to the right of ownership are exercised’ this paper argues that ‘status’ is emphasised at the expense of ‘condition’. Slavery was declared a crime against international law much earlier than the category of crimes against humanity crystallised. In international humanitarian law it is also punishable as a war crime. In international human rights law slavery bears the distinction of being prohibited both under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights as well as – albeit less prominently – the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. In that way, it crosses the public/private divide as well as arguably sits at the threshold where entitlements almost seamlessly merge into rights. Historically slavery was justified on the one hand as an expression of natural law and contradictorily on the other hand as only justifiable through positive law because it was in breach of natural law. It therefore interrogated even the natural law/positive law dichotomy in illuminating ways. The inclusion of enslavement under the rubric of crimes against humanity therefore helps to not only further explain the essential elements of that category but also highlights how humanity itself is an evolving project and international criminal law plays a crucial role in this on-going anthropogenesis.


Mephistopheles: I’m your slave: I’m yours!


Faust: And what must I do in exchange?


Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Faust




Keywords: Giorgio Agamben – Roberto Esposito – international criminal law – international human rights law – Roman Law


 


Dr Edwin Bikundo is a Senior Lecturer at the Griffith Law School, Program Director for the Master of International Law, and Managing Editor of the Griffith Law Review. The Griffith Law School is located on the Gold Coast Campus of Griffith University. 


 

Dec
2
Mon
Law in End Times: Juris Apocalypse Now! (LLHAA) // Survive, Thrive, Die. (LSAANZ) @ Southern Cross University, Gold Coast Campus
Dec 2 @ 8:00 pm – Dec 8 @ 4:00 am



Southern Cross University School of Law and Justice is proud to convene and organise, together with the Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia (LLHAA) and the Law and Society Association of Australia and New Zealand (LSAANZ), the 2019 LLHAA conference and the 2019 LSAANZ conference, respectively titled JurisApocalypse Now! Law in End Times, and Survive. Thrive. Die. Law in End Times.


The two conferences, although distinct and separate, are nonetheless connected by a shared overarching theme, and are articulated around a shared Postgraduate Day. Scholars are invited, in a profoundly interdisciplinary manner, to participate in either or both conferences.




Key Dates



  • LLHAA 2-4 December 2019

  • Postgraduate Day 5 December 2019

  • LSAANZ 5-7 December 2019





  • Submission of Abstracts opens on 1 March 2019.

  • Closing date for submission of Abstracts is 31 July 2019.

  • Presenters must register by 31 August 2019.





  • Early Bird until 31 July 2019

  • Full Price from 1 August – 15 November 2019




Visit the website









Juris Apocalypse Now! Law in End Times – 2-4 December 2019




The conference will explore the intersection of legality, temporality and eschatology, the normatively uncertain and yet inherently creative space originated by the conflicting encounter between the orderly desire of law and the entropic tendency of apocalyptic narratives, with both forces cast against the backdrop of the ever-­deferred notion of time itself.


LLHAA conference registration automatically entitles you to become a member of the Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia (LLHAA) for a period of 12 months. Your contact information will be supplied to the LLHAA in order to receive Association communication. This includes information about prizes and upcoming relevant events. Your contact information is not given out to a third party except those institutions hosting LLHAA associated events. If you do not want this to happen then tick the box (below) asking to opt out of communications. You can also opt out of Association membership per se but you cannot opt to eliminate the membership fee from your conference registration. You can choose to opt out of LLHAA membership at checkout. 





 


Download the 2019 LLHAA Conference Postcard






Survive, Thrive, Die. Law in End Times. 5-7 December 2019





Social upheaval, political uncertainty, the end of history, or climate collapse: increasingly, such narratives seem to justify the state of exception in a plethora of contexts, slowly eroding the idea that social, political, and environmental stability can ever be achieved through the rule of law. The conference invites socio-legal scholars to re-imagine the question of law in the face of the ‘end times’.







Download the 2019 LSAANZ Conference Postcard











Additional Information


Visit the website: sljresearch.net.au/lawinendtimes



  • Submission of Abstracts opens on 1 March 2019.

  • Closing date for submission of Abstracts is 31 July 2019.

  • Presenters must register by 31 August 2019.


For each conference:



  • Early Bird $390 until 31 July 2019

  • Full Price $450 from 1 August – 15 November 2019

  • Conference Dinner $80


Attend BOTH conferences



  • Early Bird $580 until 31 July 2019

  • Full Price $680 from 1 August – 15 November 2019


One-day only attendance options will be available shortly.