Issue 2 - November 2018

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Welcome to the 2nd Edition of SLJ Research

Our first issue, published in late 2017, celebrated a year of research success; growing publication outputs, the launch of a keynote lecture in legal theory and critique, visiting judge and artist in residence programs, and a monthly research seminar series. As 2018 draws to a close, these key benchmarks continue to flourish, while new programs and events unroll.

This year, I can report on a busy list of research activities that are testament to a rich research culture in the SLJ, one that plays to our enduring strengths: a scholarly tradition that is critical, theoretical, cultural, progressive, and deeply imbued with an ethos of social and environmental justice. Film screenings, book readings, keynote conference papers, monthly research seminars, quality publication outputs, grants success, traditional and non-traditional research impacts, symposia, In Conversation events, Thursday Night Live provocations at the Quad – it has been a full year.

Upcoming SLJ Events

There are no upcoming Events at this time.

Other Events

Oct
3
Thu
Our Data Ourselves: A Case Study of Sperm @ Southern Cross University
Oct 3 @ 10:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Our Data Ourselves: A Case Study of Sperm @ Southern Cross University | East Lismore | NSW | AU

Our Data Ourselves: A Case Study of Sperm


Advances in biotechnology have facilitated the growth of the tissue economy, including the commodification of human gametes—sperm and eggs. Unlike eggs, and alone amongst human tissue, sperm are designed for exchange. They are readily extracted without the need for medical intervention and remain viable for a window of time without biomedical transformation. Yet these characteristics create challenges for the law in responding to ever more diverse contexts for the collection and utilisation of sperm. This is evidenced by the increase in applications to the court for extraction of sperm from deceased men and claims for their possession and use.


Broadly speaking, the characterisation of sperm before the courts is that of property, or at the very least quasi-property; a thing capable of an order for possession. Yet orders permitting post-mortem harvesting and utilisation raise complex questions about the basis for such decisions: both as to the reproductive autonomy of the deceased, and as to the grey area between what the law considers property and what it considers person.


This paper examines the law’s categorisation of sperm—from its natural state within the body of its progenitor up to the point of impregnation—to identify the inherent inconsistency of the law’s approach and the problematic consequences. It offers an alternative conceptualisation of sperm as a biological form of personal data, using the analogy of human gametes as a cryptographic key, requiring a match (a human egg) to unlock the reproductive potential they both contain. On this understanding of the nature of sperm, the consequences of intermingled data for the sperm donor—namely the creation of a potential new human—might provide a rationale for the law to determine permission to keep and to use sperm only where the donor has given active and ongoing informed consent. Consequently, this paper argues in favour of the legal categorisation of sperm even outside the body, and even post-mortem, as person and not as property.




Associate Professor Kate Galloway, Faculty of Law, Bond University


Kate’s principal academic interests lie in property law and legal education. She is a nationally recognised law teacher, using research-informed approaches to teach property law and in designing and teaching subjects that offer students a future-focussed view of legal practice.


Kate publishes and presents both in Australia and internationally in academic, professional, and community contexts. Her work encompasses legal education, property – particularly land tenure, sustainability, social justice, and gender equality. She is the editor-in-chief of the Legal Education Review, and the Queensland editor of the Alternative Law Journal.


In addition to her academic writing, Kate contributes regularly to various media outlets as a commentator on contemporary social justice issues, especially concerning gender equality. She is active on social media, blogging at https://kategalloway.net/.


Throughout her career, Kate has been involved in the community legal sector, including having worked to establish the North Queensland Women’s Legal Service and currently serving on the management committee of the EDO (NQ).



Dec
2
Mon
Juris Apocalypse Now! Law in End Times @ Southern Cross University
Dec 2 – Dec 4 all-day
Juris Apocalypse Now! Law in End Times @ Southern Cross University | Bilinga | Queensland | Australia

2019 Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia’s conference

School of Law and Justice
Southern Cross University, Gold Coast Campus
2-4 December 2019

The conference will explore the intersection of legality, temporality and eschatology, the normatively uncertain and yet inherently creative space originated by the conflicting encounter between the orderly desire of law and the entropic tendency of apocalyptic narratives, with both forces cast against the backdrop of the ever-­deferred notion of time itself.

More information will be available as the conference website is developed.

Law in End Times: Juris Apocalypse Now! (LLHAA) // Survive, Thrive, Die. (LSAANZ) @ Southern Cross University, Gold Coast Campus
Dec 2 @ 8:00 pm – Dec 8 @ 4:00 am



Southern Cross University School of Law and Justice is proud to convene and organise, together with the Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia (LLHAA) and the Law and Society Association of Australia and New Zealand (LSAANZ), the 2019 LLHAA conference and the 2019 LSAANZ conference, respectively titled JurisApocalypse Now! Law in End Times, and Survive. Thrive. Die. Law in End Times.


The two conferences, although distinct and separate, are nonetheless connected by a shared overarching theme, and are articulated around a shared Postgraduate Day. Scholars are invited, in a profoundly interdisciplinary manner, to participate in either or both conferences.




Key Dates



  • LLHAA 2-4 December 2019

  • Postgraduate Day 5 December 2019

  • LSAANZ 5-7 December 2019





  • Submission of Abstracts opens on 1 March 2019.

  • Closing date for submission of Abstracts has been extended to 30 September 2019.

  • Presenters must register by 15 September 2019.





  • Early Bird EXTENDED until 15 September 2019

  • Full Price from16 September – 15 November 2019




Visit the website









Juris Apocalypse Now! Law in End Times – 2-4 December 2019




The conference will explore the intersection of legality, temporality and eschatology, the normatively uncertain and yet inherently creative space originated by the conflicting encounter between the orderly desire of law and the entropic tendency of apocalyptic narratives, with both forces cast against the backdrop of the ever-­deferred notion of time itself.


LLHAA conference registration automatically entitles you to become a member of the Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia (LLHAA) for a period of 12 months. Your contact information will be supplied to the LLHAA in order to receive Association communication. This includes information about prizes and upcoming relevant events. Your contact information is not given out to a third party except those institutions hosting LLHAA associated events. If you do not want this to happen then tick the box (below) asking to opt out of communications. You can also opt out of Association membership per se but you cannot opt to eliminate the membership fee from your conference registration. You can choose to opt out of LLHAA membership at checkout. 





 


Download the 2019 LLHAA Conference Postcard






Survive, Thrive, Die. Law in End Times. 5-7 December 2019





Social upheaval, political uncertainty, the end of history, or climate collapse: increasingly, such narratives seem to justify the state of exception in a plethora of contexts, slowly eroding the idea that social, political, and environmental stability can ever be achieved through the rule of law. The conference invites socio-legal scholars to re-imagine the question of law in the face of the ‘end times’.







Download the 2019 LSAANZ Conference Postcard











Additional Information


Visit the website: sljresearch.net.au/lawinendtimes



  • Submission of Abstracts opens on 1 March 2019.

  • Closing date for submission of Abstracts is 30 September 2019.

  • Presenters must register by 15 September 2019.


For each conference:



  • Early Bird $390 until 15 September 2019

  • Full Price $450 from 16 September – 15 November 2019

  • Conference Dinner $80


Attend BOTH conferences



  • Early Bird $580 until 15 September 2019

  • Full Price $680 from 16 September – 15 November 2019

Dec
5
Thu
Survive, Thrive, Die. Law in End Times @ Southern Cross University
Dec 5 – Dec 7 all-day
Survive, Thrive, Die. Law in End Times @ Southern Cross University | Bilinga | Queensland | Australia

2019 Law and Society Association of Australia and New Zealand conference

School of Law and Justice
Southern Cross University, Gold Coast Campus
5-7 December 2019

Social upheaval, political uncertainty, the end of history, or climate collapse: increasingly, such narratives seem to justify the state of exception in a plethora of contexts, slowly eroding the idea that social, political, and environmental stability can ever be achieved through the rule of law.

The conference invites socio-legal scholars to re-imagine the question of law in the face of the ‘end times’.

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